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Managing Your Risks: Patient and Physician Health in the Cath Lab

Posted by Corindus Staff
October 08, 2013
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In this post we’ll explore the issue of radiation exposure, occupational risks in the catheterization lab, and how that can impact your care.

 

I. Patient Risks in the Cath Lab

 

Fluoroscopy is a type of medical imaging used during percutaneous coronary interventions that displays a continuous x-ray image. Blood flow and artery blockages are not able to be seen using x-ray only imaging. Physicians inject a contrast solution into the arteries so that when an x-ray beam is passed through the tissue, the physician can get a real-time image of the coronary arteries. On average, angioplasty procedures will last about an hour, this means the patient is exposed to ionizing radiation from the fluoroscopy for a significant amount of time. Lengthy procedures lead to greater exposure to the radiation of fluoroscopy.

 

Radiation has a cumulative effect and leads to increased risk for many conditions, most notably, cancer. In healthcare where radiation is required for treatment, there is a prevailing philosophy called ALARA, which stands for as low as (is) reasonably achievable. Wherever possible, physicians should be looking for ways to limit exposure to radiation to limit the cumulative effects of radiation on patients. Along with the risks posed by radiation, patients in the cath lab also face potentially high doses of the contrast medium which can cause a condition known as contrast induced nephropathy. The contrast solution that is so valuable to imaging can be toxic to the kidneys, and when the body is unable to process the contrast, it leads to CIN in which the kidneys shut down. While most patients who develop CIN typically recover within 1- 2 weeks, it can cause serious renal (kidney) complications in patients with certain risk factors including diabetes, prior kidney transplant, chronic kidney disease, and hypertensive disorders. Therefore, physicians need to keep a constant watch on the contrast volume used during procedures to minimize the risk of CIN.

 

II. Occupational Hazards in the Cath Lab

 

It is well documented that Interventional Cardiologists face serious dangers of long-term radiation exposure in the cath lab. Risks to clinicians include: skin damage to hands and exposed tissue, injury to the lens of the eye/ cataracts, and in some cases the development of brain tumors and other cancers. In a 2012 study, researchers found an increased incidence of left hemisphere brain tumors in a study group of interventional cardiologists that may be attributed to the prolonged exposure to ionizing radiation to the left side of the head during interventional procedures.

 

Via LifeScience PLUS
Physicians in the Cardiac Cath Lab (Via LifeScience PLUS)
 

Lead aprons are the standard convention used in Cath labs across the US to reduce radiation exposure to physicians and staff; however these protective barriers can weigh between 15-20 pounds and place up to 300 pounds per square inch of pressure on vertebral disks. In one study more than 400 interventionalists were surveyed and 71% of the study population reported some type of orthopedic disease. According to Dr. Tom Ports, Director of Interventional Cardiology at University of San Francisco, the leading cause of early retirement for interventional cardiologists is spinal injury!

 

Attention to the danger of radiation exposure and other risks in the cath lab for both patients and staff is on the rise. As more focus is being brought upon safety practices in the cath lab, improved procedural measures are being put in place to protect physicians and staff, and improve the quality of care for patients.

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